Terminology Tuesday: Real Presence Of Christ In The Eucharist

*The belief that Jesus Christ is actually physically and sacramentally present in the bread and the wine at the Lord’s Table, or Holy Communion. The biblical basis for this view includes a literal understanding of Jesus’ words of instruction, “This is my body. … This is my blood” (Mk 14: 22,24) as well as the supposed allusion to the Eucharist in Jesus’ bread-of-life discourse (Jn 6: 53-58). The real presence is taught by Lutherans and Roman Catholics (with substantial differences).

*Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 99-100

God Bless

Brian Mason

Terminology Tuesday: Materialism

*A philosophical outlook that contends that physical matter is the only reality or category of existence, so that everything that exists is a manifestation of the material (rather than a manifestation of the mind). In more popular parlance, the term refers to pursuit of money and possessions as a central goal of human existence. See also monism.

*Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 76

God Bless
Brian Mason

Terminology Tuesday: Monasticism

*A way of life within the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox traditions that emphasizes celibacy, life-in-community, poverty, common worship, silence and contemplation. The monastic movement spawned monasteries as places in which monks could live and work together, generally as cloistered from the larger society.

God Bless
Brian Mason

*Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 80

Terminology Tuesday: Determinism

*Any theory that sees all events, including human behavior, as the necessary result of prior causes. Naturalistic determinism sees all events as part of an inflexible and unalterable chain of cause and effect in the physical universe. Theological determinism sees all events as being directly caused by God. Many theologians (although there are notable exceptions) reject both naturalistic and theological determinism because both theories seem to contradict the possibility of human freedom of choice, which in their view leaves humans morally not responsible for their actions.

*Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 38

God Bless

Brian Mason

Terminology Tuesday: metanarrative

*The idea that there is an overarching, all-embracing story of humankind into which all of creation – fall – redemption – new creation is this all-embracing metanarrative, for the biblical story is the narrative of all humankind. In this sense the biblical narrative functions in Christian teaching as the central metanarrative.

*Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 77

God Bless

Brian Mason

Terminology Tuesday: EVIL

*Any act or event that is contrary to the good and holy purposes of God. Theologians generally distinguish between moral and natural evil. Moral evil refers to acts (sins) of creatures that are contrary to God’s holy character and law. Natural evils include harmful or destructive events in nature that occur throughout the course of history and that negatively affect creaturely life (e.g., earthquakes and famines). Some theologians (e.g., Augustine) emphasize that evil does not have independent existence as a “thing” but is either the moral evaluation of acts or the ultimate consequence or effect of such evil acts on creation.

* Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki & Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 48

God Bless
Brian Mason

Terminology Tuesday: Heresy

*Any teaching rejected by the Christian community as contrary to Scripture and hence to orthodox doctrine. Most of the teachings that have been declared heretical have to do with either the nature of God or the person of Jesus Christ. The term heresy is not generally used to characterize non-Christian belief. That is to say, systems of belief such as atheism or agnosticism, or non-Christian religions such as Buddhism or Islam are not technically heresy. The term heresy is generally reserved for any belief that claims to be Christian and scriptural but has been rejected by the church as sub-Christian or antiscriptural.

* *Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki & Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 58

God Bless

Brian Mason